The Muse

6 October, 2008

By Michael Willoughby

Michael Willoughby went to visit Bere Architecture’s Muse, a proto-PassivHaus in Newington Green, east London, with his camera.

OPEN HOUSE GREEN SKY STUDIOS EVENT AT THE MUSE, ISLINGTON, LONDON, 26TH SEPTEMBER 2008

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND BOOKING A PLACE REFER TO THE OPEN HOUSE WEBSITE  www.openhouse.org.uk/sustainability/index.html  

bere:architects are hosting an event at Justin Bere’s own ecological house which also contains an office of ten full time architectural staff. The morning will consist of three modules as follows:

At last I feel as if my plans for a little nature reserve in the middle of London are coming to fruition!

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The daisies and cornflowers have now been joined by poppies. Both the cornflowers and poppies have been very popular with the bumblebees. The insect population is beginning to develop and this is the first native greenshield bug thats been seen in the garden. Bird visitor numbers have steadily increased and they seem to enjoy the hazel coppice near the feeders. The regular list of visitors now includes: bullfinches, goldfinches, greenfinches, sparrows, robins, blackbirds and great tits.

Easter Sunday saw BBC1’s Countryfile programme feature Justin Bere’s eco-house ‘The Muse’. Interviewing both Justin Bere, the architect and owner of the house and Dusty Gedge of Living Roofs, the programme provided an in-depth review of the achievements and aspirations that have driven the development of this pioneering project in the Canonbury area of Islington.

The following is taken from the Countryfile website…

Eco house

The Muse

20 tonnes of soil has now been loaded on to the Muse, Justin Bere’s own self-build experimental home and an all-native planting scheme has been installed in good time to get settled in before the growing season. Justin says: “at last we got 20 tonnes of soil on the roofs of my house and we have completed an all-native planting scheme, including a native hawthorn thicket, a native hazel woodland with native honeysuckle and two native wild-flower meadows. Also forty native birch trees have been planted along the gravel entranceway.

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